Saturday, 15 February 2020

Water Flossing

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Water flossing is a way to clean between and around your teeth. A water flosser is a handheld device that sprays streams of water in steady pulses. The water, like traditional floss, removes food from between teeth. 
Water flossers that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance have been tested to be safe and effective at removing a sticky film called plaque, which puts you at a higher risk for cavities and gum disease. Water flossers with the ADA Seal can also help reduce gingivitis, the early form of gum disease, throughout your mouth and between your teeth. Get a list of all ADA-Accepted water flossers. 
Water flossers can be an option for people who have trouble flossing by hand. People who have had dental work that makes flossing difficult—like braces, or permanent or fixed bridges—also might try water flossers. 
Cleaning between your teeth once a day is an important part of your dental hygiene routine. You should also brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes and see your dentist regularly.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Honolulu Smile Design   
John Ha, DDS  
1481 S. King Street, Suite 303
Honolulu, HI 96814  
(808) 941-2088  
HonoluluSmileDesign.com

Thursday, 6 February 2020

Dental Anesthesia Side Effects And Causes For Treatment

Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com

Medical procedures are sometimes necessary to maintain your health, including oral health. Anesthesia is inherent to more involved procedures, whether it's knee surgery or filling an advanced cavity, and when properly administered, it isn't a point of concern. But some people do suffer from dental anesthesia side effects. Here's a look into anesthesia and why some patients don't respond as well to it.
Anesthesia Types
There are two types of anesthesia: local and general. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) defines local anesthesia as "the temporary loss of sensation including pain in one part of the body produced by a topically-applied or injected agent without depressing the level of consciousness." In effect, your dentist simply desensitizes a portion of your mouth by injecting medicine into the gum or inner cheek; you can stay awake for this process. General anesthesia, according to Aetna, sedates you for an extended period of time, and an air tube allows you to breathe while you're asleep.
Although the term can be misleading, general anesthesia has a much more specific role to your comfort during a procedure, and is administered by a trained professional such as an oral-maxillofacial surgeon or medical anesthesiologist. Local (or regional) anesthesia is used for much simpler types of treatment, wherein your needs are minor enough that your bodily state can remain the same.
Procedures Requiring Anesthesia
Unfortunately, not all trips to the dentist are as easy as a routine cleaning so check before booking your next appointment. Tooth extraction is one of the most common processes necessitating anesthesia. When a tooth that has become decayed needs to be removed, the doctor anesthetizes the area of your mouth surrounding that tooth. Wisdom teeth are another common cause for anesthezed removal, usually due to impaction or simply not having enough room to erupt.
Although root canals have become much easier over the years, they are another example of when an anesthesia is necessary. When a tooth's pulp becomes damaged or diseased, the part of the tooth that houses the pulp needs to be removed and sealed, thereby saving the tooth from extraction. Probably the most common need for anesthesia, however, is in the filling of a cavity. A filling is required when a small section of your tooth succumbs to decay, creating a small area that the dentist will remove the decay and fill the cavity.
Dental Anesthesia Side Effects
Side effects from a local anesthesia are few and far between, but they do occasionally arise. Numbness felt beyond the affected part of the mouth is a very common one. Following a local injection to your gums, for example, the medicine can cause your eyelid or cheek muscles to droop. After the anesthesia wears off, this numbness dissipates. Here are a few more:
  • Unable to blink – If you can't blink one of your eyes, your dentist can tape it shut until the numbness ceases so that it doesn't dry out.
  • Hematoma – Described as a blood-filled swelling, this can happen if the needle strikes a blood vessel upon injection.
  • Racing heart beat – The vasoconstrictor drug in the anesthesia can increase your heart beat for a minute or two. Be sure to mention this to your doctor if you notice it.
  • Nerve damage – If the needle directly hits a nerve, the result can be numbness and pain that lasts for weeks or months. Nerve damage is very rare in a regional injection, according to the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA).
The best way to avoid any dental anesthesia side effects is to lower your risk of issues that warrant a desensitizing solution. A good way to achieve that goal is by using a toothpaste such as Colgate TotalSF Advanced Deep Clean. Brushing, flossing and a healthy diet are all keys to keeping a healthy mouth. Of course, make sure you schedule your regular dental checkup, too.
To read the entire article visit colgate.com
Honolulu Smile Design   
John Ha, DDS  
1481 S. King Street, Suite 303
Honolulu, HI 96814  
(808) 941-2088  
HonoluluSmileDesign.com

Saturday, 25 January 2020

New Year, Healthier Mouth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org


What does ringing in the new year have to do with being mouth healthy? 
More than you may think. Did you know that you should replace your toothbrush every three to four months? Bristles that become frayed and worn are less effective at cleaning your teeth. That means, celebrating the new year with a brand new toothbrush is actually smart dental hygiene.


Here are MouthHealthy resolutions:

  • Start brushing 2min2x. Always brush twice a day for two minutes for healthier teeth, good breath, fewer cavities, and to avoid painful dental problems. 
  • Floss daily. Flossing is part of being mouth healthy.
  • Chew sugarless gum. Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.
  • Drink fluoridated water. Fluoride helps prevent cavities by making teeth more resistant to the acid attacks that cause cavities.
  • See your dentist. Regular dental visits will help you be Mouth Healthy for Life.  
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Honolulu Smile Design   
John Ha, DDS  
1481 S. King Street, Suite 303
Honolulu, HI 96814  
(808) 941-2088  
HonoluluSmileDesign.com

Wednesday, 15 January 2020

Finding A Dentist

Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com



How Do I Look for a Dentist? 
A good place to start is by asking for a referral from people you trust — your friends, family, acquaintances, work associates, pharmacist or family doctor. Ask them how long they've gone to their dentist, how comfortable they feel asking questions, what type of dentist they go to (general or specialist). It is important that you find a dentist with whom you feel comfortable.
Other ways to find a dentist include:
  • Calling your local dental society for a list of recommended dentists in your area. Your local dental society can be found in the Yellow Pages under "dentist."
  • Searching online for dentists in your area. More and more dentists have websites explaining their approach and treatment methods.
What Kind of Dentist Should I Look for?
General dentists are trained to do all types of treatment. If you have difficult or unusual problems, your dentist may refer you to one of the following specialists:
  • Pediatric Dentists/Pedodontists specialize in pediatric (children's) dentistry.
  • Endodontists diagnose and treat diseased tooth pulp and perform root canal work (many general dentists also perform root canals).
  • Prosthodontists specialize in crowns, bridges and dentures.
  • Oral pathologists use laboratory procedures to diagnose diseases of the mouth. They also specialize in forensic dentistry.
  • Oral/Maxillofacial surgeons perform surgical treatments, such as removing cysts, tumors and teeth. They can correct fractures or other jaw problems that require surgery, including temporomandibular joint (TMJ). They also use methods similar to those of plastic surgery to treat cosmetic problems of the jaw and face.
  • Orthodontists correct improperly positioned teeth, using braces and other appliances to move teeth into a better position.
  • Periodontists specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of gum disease.
How do You Become a Practicing Dentist?
A general practitioner or specialist can be degreed as either a D.D.S. (Doctor of Dental Surgery) or a D.M.D. (Doctor of Dental Medicine), depending on the school from which he/she graduated. The requirements for each degree are identical: four years of post-graduate study for general practice plus one to two years of advanced study for a particular specialty. A graduate must then pass a state licensing examination in order to begin practice.
To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Honolulu Smile Design   
John Ha, DDS  
1481 S. King Street, Suite 303
Honolulu, HI 96814  
(808) 941-2088  

HonoluluSmileDesign.com

Tuesday, 14 January 2020

Promote Oral Health With Good Nutrition

Calcium And Vitamin C Promote Oral Health
Eating a variety of nutritious food is good for your overall health, including your oral health. Some vitamins in particular have demonstrated benefits to building healthy teeth, namely calcium and vitamin C, so be sure to include foods rich in these nutrients in your diet. Calcium has been shown to help build strong teeth, and vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that also plays an important role in collagen synthesis, by which it helps you develop and maintain healthy gums.

  • Calcium: Dairy products, including milk, yogurt and cheese are good sources of calcium. Many physicians recommend 1,200 to 1,500 milligrams of calcium daily for most adults, so you may want to consider a calcium supplement, especially if dairy products aren’t a regular part of your diet. Also, try switching to low-sugar or sugar-free varieties of yogurt, since sugar (and bacteria) can promote tooth decay.
  • Vitamin C: Many fruits and vegetables including berries, oranges and cantaloupe, as well as green vegetables including broccoli and spinach are excellent sources of vitamin C.

Of course, in addition to eating right, it’s important to follow a consistent dental care routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing to promote oral health. And be sure to see your dental professional regularly and talk to them if you have questions about how your diet might affect your oral health.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Honolulu Smile Design   
John Ha, DDS  
1481 S. King Street, Suite 303
Honolulu, HI 96814  
(808) 941-2088  
HonoluluSmileDesign.com

The Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene

The Cost Of Dental Treatments
If you develop complications from tooth decay and gum disease, you may be dealing with bills for anything from fillings or crowns to more costly and complicated procedures such as root canals or oral surgery to extract damaged teeth and place dental implants.

The Costs Vary 
The costs of dental treatments vary. For example, the cost of a root canal will depend on the location of the tooth and how many canals are in the tooth that needs the root canal treatment. 

The Cost of Oral Hygiene
By comparison, the cost of basic oral hygiene and preventive teeth cleaning is low. A toothbrush should be replaced every three months or when it appears worn, but that’s just a few dollars. The same goes for dental floss, whether you prefer specialized floss, such as Oral-B’s Ultra Floss, or standard floss. 

Points To Remember
Also, don’t forget that most dental plans cover at least one, and sometimes two, checkups and cleanings per year at little or no cost to you. It’s better to make and keep those appointments, even if you don’t think you have problems with your teeth or oral hygiene, in order to identify and manage potential problems before costly care is required. Remember that your dentist is your partner in oral health, and be sure to keep him or her informed about medications you take and changes in your overall health so your oral hygiene can be tailored accordingly to maximize your health benefits. Some types of medications (including anti-depressants and some heart medications) increase your risk for gingivitis, so be sure to let your dentist know if you start taking any new medication, even if you don’t think it will affect your oral health. 

The above article is from: OralB.com

Honolulu Smile Design   
John Ha, DDS  
1481 S. King Street, Suite 303
Honolulu, HI 96814  
(808) 941-2088  
HonoluluSmileDesign.com

Great Ways to Improve Your Smile # 3

Veneers
Veneers are thin shells crafted of tooth-colored materials designed to cover the front side of teeth. Unlike bonding, it is necessary to remove a small amount of enamel from your tooth to accommodate the shell. Based on a model of your mouth, they are meant to look like your natural teeth. 

The above article is from: MouthHealthy.org

Honolulu Smile Design   
John Ha, DDS  
1481 S. King Street, Suite 303
Honolulu, HI 96814  
(808) 941-2088  
HonoluluSmileDesign.com